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Future Stratigraphy symposium and artist talks online

Future Stratigraphy Symposium: 18 October 2016, Sydney College of the Arts.

The Future Stratigraphy symposium explored ways of understanding and envisioning the materiality of country and landscape across disciplines, cultures and time.

Introductions
Welcome – Oliver Smith, New Materialism in Contemporary Art research cluster SCA Acknowledgement of Country – Mariko Smith, Wingara Mura Fellow SCA
Introduction – Tracey Clement, artist, arts writer and current PhD candidate at SCA

Keynote Lecture – John Roloff – ‘Sentient Terrains IV’
John Roloff is an artist and professor at San Francisco Art Institute. John was in Sydney as SCA’s guest international artist for the Future Stratigraphy program.

Matt Poll – ‘Glimpsing landscapes of the past through stone tool technologies’
Matt Poll is the Assistant Curator of the Macleay Museum Indigenous Heritage Collections and the University of Sydney’s Repatriation Project Officer.

Ron Boyd – ‘A Marine Geologist’s View of the Anthropocene’
Ron Boyd is a conjoint professor at the University of Newcastle, he has worked as a marine geologist with forty years experience in the field.

Panel discussion – ‘Future Stratigraphy’
John Roloff, Matt Poll, Ron Boyd and Tracey Clement.

Artist talks – Future Stratigraphy Exhibition, SCA Galleries
Sean O’Connell, Madeleine Boyd, Penny Dunstan, Emma Robertson, Kath Fries, Dell Walker, Tracey Clement and Kenneth Mitchell.

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Above image: Future Stratigraphy exhibition, documentation photograph by Ian Hobbs.
Artworks from left: Kenneth Mitchell, Crystal Amplifiers (2016); Josh Wodak, Jubilee Venn Diagrams? (2014); Penny Dunstan, Rix’s Creek Study #3 and #4 (2015-2016); Tracey Clement, Critical Cartography (2014-2016); Kath Fries, Within and without (2016).

Future Stratigraphy Symposium

Future Stratigraphy invite

Future Stratigraphy Symposium
2 – 6pm Tuesday 18 October 2016
SCA Auditorium, Sydney College of the Arts

This symposium will explore ways of understanding and envisioning the materiality of country and landscape across disciplines, cultures, and time. link

Free event – all welcome, REGISTER HERE»

PROGRAM

2pm
Welcome, Oliver Smith, New Materialism in Contemporary Art research cluster, Sydney College of the Arts

Acknowledgement of Country, Janelle Evans, Wingara Mura Fellow and Dharug/Bundjalung artist, Sydney College of the Arts

Keynote lecture, John Roloff, Guest international artist, San Francisco Art Institute

PresentationMatt Poll, Curator Indigenous Heritage and Repatriation Project, Macleay Museum, University of Sydney

Presentation, Ron Boyd, Conjoint Associate Professor, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle

Panel discussion: John Roloff, Matt Poll, Ron Boyd. Chaired by Tracey Clement, PhD candidate, artist and writer, Sydney College of the Arts 

4pm
Afternoon tea break

4.30pm
Artist talks, Sydney College of the Arts Galleries
Sean O’Connell, Penny Dunstan, Kath Fries, Emma Robertson, Dell Walker, Tracey Clement, Kenneth Mitchell and Madeleine Boyd.

SYMPOSIUM PRESENTERS

Ron Boyd is a conjoint professor at the University of Newcastle, he has worked as a marine geologist with forty years experience in the field. Boyd has published over 200 scientific articles and book chapters. Recently he has been working with multi beam imagery in marine geology researching seismic and sediments off Australia and the USA. Boyd has worked with Larry Mayer at UNH/CCOM and also runs his own research voyages off the East Coast of Australia from coast to deep ocean. more info

Tracey Clement is an artist, arts writer and current PhD candidate at SCA, the University of Sydney. Her current research responds to JG Ballard’s novel The Drowned World. She is known for creating artworks that meticulously utilise labour intensive techniques for their conceptual resonance. In her Critical Cartography series of maps (exhibited in Future Stratigraphy) Clement charts hypothetical rising sea levels. The time-consuming effort of ‘drowning’ the world through drawing highlights our complicity in creating the current climate crisis. Clement has exhibited widely, both in Australia and overseas, and she is currently the Online Editor for Art Guide Australia. traceyclement.com

Matt Poll is the Assistant Curator of the Macleay Museum Indigenous Heritage Collections and the University of Sydney’s Repatriation Project Officer. He has previously worked as the Artistic Director of Boomalli Aboriginal Artists cooperative as well as other positions at the Museum of Contemporary Art and Wollongong City Gallery. Poll’s current research project seeks to further develop methods of understanding the ways contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island artists have used museum collections, historic records and archival materials in the reconstruction of cultural identities, exploring how visual artists in particular have developed auto ethnographic methods of engaging with historical information outside of academic frameworks. more info

John Roloff is an artist and professor at San Francisco Art Institute. He works conceptually with site, process and natural systems. With a background in science and geology, Roloff’s work engages poetic and site-specific relationships between material, concept and performance in the domains of geology, ecology, architecture, ceramics, industry and mining, metabolic systems and history. Roloff’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, UC Berkeley Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Smithsonian Institution, Photoscene Cologne, the Venice Architectural and Art Biennales. He has received fellowships from the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts, Guggenheim Foundation and California Arts Council. Roloff is represented by Anglim Gilbert Gallery, San Francisco, CA. johnroloff.com

Future Stratigraphy: Masterclass with John Roloff

Masterclass: The Sea Within The Land
with John Roloff
2 – 6pm Tuesday 17 October 2016
Sydney College of the Arts and Callan Park

As part of our Future Stratigraphy program, this masterclass with international artist John Roloff will explore site-engagement processes focusing on Callan Park as the site of Roloff’s Sydney project, The Sea within the Land. The masterclass will involve walking the site; discussing the area’s past, present and future (in relation to geology, mapping, flora and fauna, and human engagement – the Gadigal and Wangal traditional custodians, history as colonial estate and psychiatric hospital, and current uses); and an outside workshop with above-ground echo-sounder technology.

EOI: to participate in the masterclass please send a short statement about yourself and why you’re interested, to Kath Fries and Oliver Smith at sca_newmaterialism@sydney.edu.au by 30 September 2016. The masterclass is free but places are limited.

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Image: John Roloff, Displaced Sea / Seeking the Permanente, 2014, inkjet print on drafting film, 60x120cm. Courtesy the artist and Anglim Gilbert Gallery, San Francisco.

ABOUT JOHN ROLOFF
John Roloff is a visual artist and professor at San Francisco Art Institute. He works conceptually with site, process and natural systems. With a background in science and geology, Roloff’s work engages poetic and site-specific relationships between material, concept and performance in the domains of geology, ecology, architecture, ceramics, industry and mining, metabolic systems and history. He is known primarily for his outdoor kiln/furnace projects from the late 1970’s to the early 1990’s as well as other large-scale environmental, site-specific and gallery installations investigating geologic and natural phenomena. Roloff’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, UC Berkeley Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Smithsonian Institution, Photoscene Cologne, the Venice Architectural and Art Biennales and The Snow Show in Kemi, Finland. He has received visual arts fellowships from the NEA, a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, a California Arts Council grant and a Bernard Osher Fellowship at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, CA. Roloff is represented by Anglim Gilbert Gallery, San Francisco, CA and is tenured faculty in Sculpture/Ceramics, San Francisco Art Institute. johnroloff.com

John Roloff will be giving the Future Stratigraphy keynote lecture on Tuesday 18 October 2016 and his work will also feature in the Future Stratigraphy exhibition, 6-29 October 2016.

Materiality of Film and Photographic Media: Workshop Nov 11, 1-4pm @SCA

berenice abbott – shadows produced by water waves -1958

NMiCA SCA Workshop
Materiality of Film and Photographic Media
Wednesday, November 11, 1-4pm
Presented by:
George Ioannides & Sean O’Connell
SCA Board Room,
Sydney College of the Arts, Rozelle

RSVP (free attendance): newmaterialism.sca@gmail.com
Each presentation will include a participatory studio component.
Workshop open to anyone with interest in New Materialisms.

Filmic Mattering: Notes towards a New Materialist, Multispecies, and Postsecular Cinematics
George Ioannides

Sirius

This workshop will present a new materialist intervention into the question of an aesthetics that can actualise a shared multispecies, postsecular materiality. It investigates the potentials of a mediated new materialism that avows a material sense of the postsecular animal subject, revealing an opening unto a religious vocabulary of immanence and transcendence that reconciles both the sacred with the material and human aesthetics with nonhuman materiality. Film media, as the focus of this presentation, is discussed here as a material-discursive aesthetic practice, a co-collaboration of material-discursive and human-nonhuman agencies that can often express the interconnectedness of life as a structure of perception and framework of experience. Such a new materialist perspective towards film redirects our attention to both the discourse of filmic images and the matter of film, as well as to the contemporary spectator’s encounter with its underlying materiality and world-making capacities. This perspective further allows us to explore what a materialised cinematics that recognises the embodied materiality and material comportment of multi-species relationality would look and feel like, and how best to speak of its importance in this postsecular present.

Studio Component:
Screening of Sirius Remembered (Stan Brakhage, 1959, US) and facilitated discussion of the new materialist reading of this film.

Readings
Workshop participants are encouraged to read two short introductions to the life and work of Stan Brakhage, the subject of this workshop’s studio component:
1. Fred Camper, ‘Stan Brakhage: A Short Introduction,’ Senses of Cinema 26 (May 2003), http://sensesofcinema.com/2003/remembering-stan-brakhage/brakhage_intro/
2. Ronald Bergan, ‘Stan Brakhage,’ The Guardian (15 March 2003), http://www.theguardian.com/news/2003/mar/15/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries

Tracing Forces
Sean O’Connell
kirlian polaroids
Exploring the visualisation of various forces within the media of photography and film, experiments and documents of artists and scientists are examined to reveal how images help us to comprehend hidden energetic exchanges coursing beneath our mundane realities.Studio Component
As a part of this presentation, participants are requested to bring a small inert object (around match-box sized), which will be bombarded with 50,000 volts of electricity, directly over manipulated polaroid film in a darkroom, and developed instantly to reveal the traces of electrical force. These polaroid documents are take-home, in black & white, or colour.

Readings
1.The Shapes of Edges, Sean O’Connell (2015)
https://newmaterialismincontemporaryart.wordpress.com/2015/03/23/the-shapes-of-edges-2/
2. ‘The matter of film : Decasia and Lyrical Nitrate’, Nicholas Chare & Liz Watkins
In Estelle Barrett & Barbara Bolt (eds.), Carnal Knowledge: Towards a ‘New Materialism’ Through the Arts. I.B. Tauris (2013)

Plant / Art Workshop @ SCA

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NMiCA SCA Workshop
Non-Human Perspectives in Art: Mine Site Rehabilitation / Plant Communication
Monday August 31, 12-3pm
SCA Board Room, Sydney College of the Arts, Rozelle
Lea Kannar-Lichtenberger (Sydney College of the Arts)
Penny Dunstan (University of Newcastle)
Each presentation included a participatory studio component.
Info: Andrew Lavery or Madeleine Boyd

Penny Dunstan
Untangling futures for terraformed lands; using respectful wayfinding as a method of knowing.
There is an overwhelming problem to be examined in the Upper Hunter Valley; a problem so big and so important that people look away. It is the terraforming operation that occurs after open cut coal mining, called land ‘rehabilitation’. This is a process that takes waste rock, spared topsoil and collected seeds and tries to reconstitute land. Scientists and engineers examine only individual parts never bumping up against the whole; although privately they will say how much their understanding of the whole problem physically hurts their connection to land. An artist has no allegiance to the reductionist framework, nor scientific prejudice against feelings of belonging and loss that prevents the interrogation of the whole hurt. Penny has developed a relationship of trust with Rix’s Creek mine management that allows her unfettered access to walk in and work with rehabilitated land. Using both her training in agronomy and art, she is developing a series of theories about developing relationships with newly created land and producing art works to explore the essence of humans as creator.
Studio component:
Drawing with satellites. We explore recording journeys using a tracking app. Bring your smart phone.
Readings:
Lesley Instone, Walking as Respectful Wayfinding in an Uncertain Age
RhD conference abstract

Lea Kannar-Lichtenberger (Sydney College of the Arts)
Exploring the microscopic world of plant communication
Many artists are looking at the Anthropocene and its wide ranging impact.  In this discussion we will explore Lea’s research into the Dandelion.  Why in particular the Dandelion and Tree Dandelion.  Why it has played a large role in her evolution research and how it fits within the Anthropocene. There are a number of very recent and not so recent studies which deal with the ideas of plant communication and memory which we will explore. The subject will be further expanded by touching on Socrates teleological view of the soul and how and when contemporary writings and shifted our connection with the wider vegetable community.  Finally Lea will look at and discuss the cell and its implications and role in the Anthropocene.
Studio Component
We will also be using a handheld mini digital microscope to explore the surface of living plants and possible insects that are part of our biosphere.  Exploring plant life through sectioning and staining different parts of various plants including the Dandelion looking at the difference in the cellular structure
We will be using Lea’s compound microscope with a live feed camera to project images of what we see onto either a laptop or large screen.

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Readings:
Crutzen, PJ. Earth System Science in the Anthropocene
Margolin, Victor. Beyond Green: Toward a Sustainable Art
Marder, Michael. Plant-thinking: a philosophy of vegetal life  

Energies in the Arts Conference: 13-15 August, 2-15 @MCA

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David Haines and Joyce Hinterding, Geology, 2015, installation view, Energies: Haines & Hinterding, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2015, real-time 3D environment, 2 x HD projections, game engine, motion sensor, spatial 3D audio. Commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, supported by Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2015, image courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney © the artist, photograph: Christopher Snee

TICKETS AVAILABLE HERE

PROGRAM DOWNLOAD

Co-presented by the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) and the National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA), UNSW Art & Design to coincide with the exhibition Energies: Haines & Hinterding 25 June-6 September, 2015 at the MCA.

The Energies in the Arts conference examines the dynamic relationship between art and energy. Bringing together scholars and artists, it aims to uncover the seemingly elusive properties and potentials of all kinds of energy – both real and imagined – to investigate how they have been understood and used in the arts and related areas of music, literature and philosophy; how various energies configure and influence one another; and how artworks and theories might be better understood through them.

Highlights:

Thurs 12:00 Keynote
Illuminating Energy and Art in the 20th Century: Linda Dalrymple Henderson (David Bruton, Jr. Centennial Professor in Art History The University of Texas at Austin)

Thurs 6.30pm Keynote
Energy Mountains: David Haines & Joyce Hinterding (Artists & Lecturers, Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney)

Fri 10:30 Carbon moon-moths: Joan Brassil’s Resonant Machines for Ecological Listening: Su Ballard (Senior Lecturer, Art History and Contemporary Arts, University of Wollongong)

Sat 2:30 Media Ecologies of the Anthropocene: Erin Obodiac (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Cornell University)